EconoMonitor

Peterson Institute for International Economics

Roubini Topic Archive: United States

  • Gasoline Prices and Electoral Politics in the Age of Unconventional Oil

    With average US gasoline prices approaching $4 per gallon, markets are trying to gauge the impact of high oil costs on a fragile US economic recovery. Some analysts have argued that surging unconventional oil production in North America will make this price spike less harmful than those in the past. But for the political class, […]

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  • Why President Obama Can Stop Worrying About Europe

    Can President Obama’s increasingly confident reelection drive come undone because of the economic turmoil in Europe? That is a question that many in the White House are said to be worrying about. The fears have some foundation based on recent experience. The relatively strong US economic recovery in early 2010—3.9 percent growth in the first […]

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  • Reauthorize the Export-Import Bank: Part II

    Reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank is stalled in Congress because of opposition from odd bedfellows. The issue has been addressed previously in this forum, but in this posting a solution to the impasse is offered that could clear the way for funding a vital federal program. Before we get to that drama, it’s worth considering […]

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  • North Korea’s Surprising Steps: ‘Modest’ Progress

    In the wake of the death of Kim Jong-il, there were questions as to whether anyone was in charge in Pyongyang.  Now we know that someone is capable of making decisions and their first one constitutes a conciliatory (indeed, concessionary), not belligerent, gesture. The agreement does not completely freeze the North Korean nuclear program but […]

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  • Iran’s Food Supply Gets Pinched

    Washington and Brussels are trying to curb Iranian oil revenue in a bid to convince Tehran to abandon its nuclear weapons program. But it appears financial sanctions imposed by the West are having a more immediate impact on what Iran buys from abroad rather than what it sells. Reports this week suggest Iranian companies are […]

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  • The KORUS Blues

    Setting aside Syria, South Korea may be the only country in the world with politics more polarized than the United States. While in Seoul last week I was reminded of this when the leaders of the political opposition attempted to march on the US embassy to deliver letters addressed to President Obama and Vice President […]

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  • Lessons for Europe’s Fiscal Union from US Federalism

    The euro area crisis and debate over fiscal reform have led many observers to pray for salvation by a modern, European version of Alexander Hamilton. By this they generally mean someone capable of leading a movement for a robust fiscal union and implementing this vision (see for example McKinnon 2011). Europe has instead, they lament, […]

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  • The Last Bullet

    US policymakers are running out of options to solve our massive unemployment problem and get the economy growing again. The Administration’s jobs bill faces resistance in Congress. The best option that can be implemented without a vote of Congress is to work through the market that started this mess in the first place—housing. The Administration […]

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  • The Internal Cost of China’s Currency Policy

    By Joseph E. Gagnon, Nicholas R. Lardy, and Nicholas Borst It is currently costing the Chinese central bank about $240 billion per year to hold down the value of the Chinese currency relative to other currencies.  This cost is growing rapidly.  The cost would decrease significantly if China allowed its currency to float and began […]

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  • Stop Sticking Our Heads in the Sand! A Plan for Action on Jobs

    Despite the claim that previous weeks’  jobs numbers were “better than expected,” they were in fact an abysmal indictment of US economic policy over the past two years. The unemployment rate has remained near or above 9 percent for 28 consecutive months, a policy failure not seen since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Unfortunately, […]

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