EconoMonitor

Nouriel Roubini's Global EconoMonitor

Archive for March, 2010

  • To Catch China, India Needs Human and Physical Capital, Says Dr. Roubini

    Bloomberg reports on Dr. Nouriel Roubini’s remarks on comparative growth in India and China. Dr. Roubini argues that India needs to invest in human capital and innovation if it wants to match Chinese GDP growth:

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  • RGE’s Wednesday Note – The Perils of Name-Calling

    This week’s newsletter is excerpted from an analysis by Nouriel Roubini: “The U.S.-China Currency and Trade Collision Course.” Dr. Roubini reflects on recent discussions with Chinese policymakers at the China Development Forum, including his suggested response to the flaring U.S.-China currency rift, as well as in-depth discussion of what might happen if the U.S. brands China a “currency manipulator.” Below is his outline of the problem.

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  • Roubini Debate with Goldman’s Jim O’Neill on the FT from Villa d’Este, Italy

    FT World Video –- FT news editor John Thornhill talks to top global economists Jim O’Neill of Goldman Sachs and Nouriel Roubini. (Subscription to the FT Required to view video)   The two economists debate and divide sharply on the Greek bailout and the future of China. Mr. O’Neill says that the Greek debt crisis […]

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  • New from RGE: The RGE 360

    Welcome to our latest newsletter enhancement, the RGE 360, a Friday morning look at the week ahead in the global economy, combined with a “Weekly Roundup” of the best content from Roubini.com and RGE EconoMonitors.

    THE WEEK AHEAD

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  • The U.S.-China Currency and Trade Collision Course

    Following my attendance at the annual China Development Forum, including a private session for Western delegates with Premier Wen Jiabao, I believe China and the United States may be on a collision course over Beijing’s insistence that it will not allow the value of the renminbi (RMB) to rise.

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  • RGE’s Wednesday Note – No Greece in the American Machine

    This week’s note draws from a new RGE Analysis, “No Greece in America’s Engine,” which was pre-released to RGE Direct Access clients on Monday and is now available to all RGE clients. The following is a brief summary of some of the macro research included in the piece—the full analysis goes into much greater depth and also includes investment strategy recommendations for clients.

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  • RGE’s Weekly Roundup

    Check out all of the RGE Analysis and EconoMonitor contributions that were published this past week at roubini.com.

    RGE Analysis:

    U.S.-China Tensions: Co-Dependency Pains by Rachel Ziemba and Adam Wolfe

    The fault lines in the U.S.-China relationship have been increasingly exposed in recent weeks, with rhetorical barbs exchanged on trade, the treatment of foreign companies in China, strategic issues such as U.S. support of Taiwan and Tibet’s Dalai Lama, responses to Iran’s nuclear ambitions and especially exchange rates. Domestic pressure in the U.S. congress on the need for action with regard to the pegged renminbi (RMB) is growing. Chinese leaders, including Premier Wen Jiabao, have recently hit back at the U.S. for what they characterize as interference in China’s security and economic affairs and U.S. economic mismangement. 

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  • Roubini NBR Interview on 0 Percent Interest Rate

    NBR — Roubini Global Economics Chairman, Nouriel Roubini on 0 Percent Interest Rate (Click for Video [9:17] and report)

    nbr_nouriel_31810.jpg

    NBR:

    SUSIE GHARIB: Joining us now with more analysis about today’s Fed decision, noted economist Nouriel Roubini, chairman of Roubini Global Economics. How Nouriel. How are you doing?

    NOURIEL ROUBINI, CHAIRMAN, ROUBINI GLOBAL ECONOMICS: Very well. Hi. Good being with you.

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  • U.S.-China Tensions: Co-Dependency Pains

    The fault lines in the U.S.-China relationship have been increasingly exposed in recent weeks, with rhetorical barbs exchanged on trade, the treatment of foreign companies in China, strategic issues such as U.S. support of Taiwan and Tibet’s Dalai Lama, responses to Iran’s nuclear ambitions and especially exchange rates. Domestic consensus in the U.S. on the need for action with regard to the renminbi (RMB) is growing. Chinese leaders, including Premier Wen Jiabao, have recently hit back at the U.S. for what they characterize as interference in China’s security and economic affairs and U.S. economic mismanagement. Today’s note draws from two recent pieces of RGE Analysis, “U.S. China Tensions: Co-Dependency Pains” and “Who Will Buy the Treasurys?” in which we examine the quest for the new normal between the world’s largest creditor and debtor. Given the importance of the relationship to global trade, growth and security, RGE believes that the two countries will avoid a full-blown confrontation, but uncertain relations and tit-for-tat trade policies could constrain global growth.

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  • States of Risk

    The Great Recession of 2008-2009 was triggered by excessive debt accumulation and leverage on the part of households, financial institutions, and even the corporate sector in many advanced economies. While there is much talk about de-leveraging as the crisis wanes, the reality is that private-sector debt ratios have stabilized at very high levels.

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