EuroGroup – Money For Nothing And Your Debt For Free?

There’s an interesting question about “analysis” which confronts anyone who seriously wants to engage in it: do you organize your focus around what you want to happen (practical policy emphasis) or do you concentrate your efforts in detailing and outlining what you think will happen? Naturally the closer you are to having an ideological discourse […]

Spain’s “Good” Deflation?

Spain’s domestic economy is booming, or so the story goes, and in no small part this boom comes thanks to the arrival of what is being termed the “good kind of deflation”, the sort everyone would like to have, a world where prices fall, real incomes rise, jobs are created, and everyone gets to live […]

QE será, será

I always dismissed arguments that the eurozone’s time as an economic power was up, pointing out the strengths of the common currency area. But I finally realized that I have been wrong all along. I start my latest Hurriyet Daily News (HDN) column by explaining why the Europeans do not know how to conduct monetary policy:)- I […]

Why QE in the Eurozone Is a Mistake

Paul De Grauwe and Yuemei Ji (“Quantitative easing in the Eurozone”, VOX, 2015) have argued that quantitative easing (QE) can occur in the Eurozone without fiscal transfers.  This may be the case, but their analysis is fundamentally misplaced, as it is based on incorrect, incomplete or missing premises.  We think it would be a mistake for […]

Toward the Eurozone’s Defining Moment (Finally)

After Greek elections, Brussels and Berlin can no longer shun the issue of debt relief. The era of inflated projections is over. Before the New Year, the Hellenic parliament rejected the nominee of Prime Minister Antonis Samaras for president. Stavros Dimas was not likely to secure two-thirds of the required 300 votes. The former European […]

Time to Scrap the Stability and Growth Pact

Today’s Eurozone fiscal discipline is the amalgamation of reforms implemented over ten years, with the latest and largest changes agreed in crisis settings. This column argues that the result fosters neither growth nor stability since actual fiscal policy has been powerfully procyclical. The focus on intermediate targets has distracted attention from the final objectives – […]

Europe’s Great Divide

In our previous post (here), we described post-electoral Europe’s stalemate in a European version of the  “Impossible Triplet” sketched by Dani Rodrik to describe the dilemmas of globalization. We drew a triangle given by the three constitutive dimensions of the EU: “European integration”, “National sovereignty”, “Democratic consensus”. Each one is incompatible with the other two.  […]

Eurocrisis Round Two, Blame the Germans Edition

“What strikes me, also, is the extent of intellectual confusion that remains.” – Paul Krugman, Europanic 2.0 “The problem is that Germany has continued to maintain highly competitive labor costs and run huge surpluses since the bubble burst — and that in a depressed world economy, this makes Germany a significant part of the problem.” […]