Growing After the Crisis: Boosting Productivity in Developing Countries

Spring in DC draws more than just tourists. Last week, government officials, policy makers, civil society representatives and other thought leaders converged to take stock of the global economy  during the IMF-World Bank spring meetings. The tone in the hallways was optimistic, but  cautious. Growth in advanced economies still remains tepid, weighed down by  lingering […]

Fiscal Revisionism

How does the attack on the two academic’s work change the landscape for macro policy, if at all? The recent challenge to a key finding of Carmen Reinhart and Ken Rogoff’s This Time Is Different (R&R) has roiled the academic world.  But it’s far less clear that it meaningfully changes the politics and economics of deficit reduction.  My […]

The Lethal Lemons on the Road to Bangladesh

I wrote yesterday about the “control frauds” (in which the person controlling a seemingly legitimate entity uses it as a “weapon” to defraud) that target purchasers of bad quality goods (“lemons”) and employees.  The example I used to explain these concepts was the collapse of the building housing garment factories in Bangladesh. As I write, there are terrible […]

Is Monetary Policy Capable of Offsetting Fiscal Austerity?

Mike Konczal has a new article where he claims there is a great natural experiment unfolding in the U.S. economy, one that Ramesh Ponnuru and I proposed back in 2011: We rarely get to see a major, nationwide economic experiment at work, but so far 2013 has been one of those experiments — specifically, an experiment to try and […]

Recession and Austerity Good for the Rich

This Real News Network interview with James Henry gives yet another vantage on our have versus have-not economy. Henry comments on a new Pew study that found that in the early stages of the “recovery,” from 2009 to 2011, the net worth of the top 7% in the US increased while those of the rest […]

The Turkish Disease

The Economist coined the term “Dutch Disease” in 1977 to describe the decline of the manufacturing sector in Holland after the discovery of large North Sea natural gas deposits in 1959. Here is the opening sentence of my latest Hurriyet Daily News (HDN) column, where I introduce the Turkish Disease, which is a variant of […]

The Trapdoors at the Fed’s Exit

The ongoing weakness of America’s economy – where deleveraging in the private and public sectors continues apace – has led to stubbornly high unemployment and sub-par growth. The effects of fiscal austerity – a sharp rise in taxes and a sharp fall in government spending since the beginning of the year – are undermining economic […]

European Depositors Don’t Take Fright from Cyprus

At the end of last week, the ECB reported that bailing in of Cypriot depositors did not scare other euro zone depositors. In fact, the ECB noted that deposits rose in March across the region, including in countries that have been suggested as potential candidates for the next aid package, including Slovenia, Malta, and Luxembourg. […]

Is Monetary Policy Capable of Offsetting Fiscal Austerity?

Mike Konczal has a new article where he claims there is a great natural experiment unfolding in the U.S. economy, one that Ramesh Ponnuru and I proposed back in 2011: We rarely get to see a major, nationwide economic experiment at work, but so far 2013 has been one of those experiments — specifically, an experiment to try and […]

1 2 3 14